Ecotourism

 Researcher Channing Hughes releases a young devil after data collection.

Researcher Channing Hughes releases a young devil after data collection.

The Carnivore Conservancy recently launched an ecotourism program in association with our field research in northwestern Tasmania. This program supports our goals in both research and education. The revenue generated by our ecotourism offerings directly supports our ongoing conservation research, enabling us to do more fieldwork and lab work than would otherwise be possible. Ecotourists who join us in the field learn about our conservation work, and many will become educational “ambassadors", sharing what they’ve learned about the importance of carnivore conservation with their family, friends and communities.

Spend a day with the devil

 Observers on our Day with the Devil trips will have the opportunity see several devils up close  —   very  close!     

Observers on our Day with the Devil trips will have the opportunity see several devils up close   very close!

 

For those who live in Tasmania or are visiting from interstate or overseas, we offer the opportunity to observe a team of researchers in the field as we check traps and handle the wild devils we capture. We average 12 devil captures per day at many of our study sites, and lucky observers may also have an opportunity to see us handle a spotted-tailed quoll or two. After collecting biological samples and a range of data, we release each animal back into the wild. Learn more.

Join a research expedition and ecological tour

 Researcher Jean-François DuCroz releases a devil after data collection.

Researcher Jean-François DuCroz releases a devil after data collection.

Overseas visitors in particular may be interested in our 14-day/13-night “voluntourism” offering, which includes eight full days working as an assistant with our field research program and four full-day sightseeing, bush-walking and wildlife-watching excursions to the natural and ecological highlights of northwestern Tasmania. All trips are led by a professional zoologist with extensive knowledge of Tasmania’s natural history. Learn more.

Photo Credits
Channing releasing devil: Photo © S. Adamczek 2013.
Devil mouth: 
Photo © S. Adamczek 2013.
Jean-François releasing devil: 
Photo © M. Parrott 2013.